Social and Emotional Learning—Essential Skills for Educators and Students

Tom Lehrer once said, “If people can’t communicate, the least they can do is shut-up!” Would that it were so simple. In today’s global melting pot, it’s more important than ever that adults and students master and employ skills that enable them to succeed beyond academics. The concept of Social and Emotional Learning (SEL) is not new, but there is growing interest in this framework. Watch this recorded webinar to learn more about the five SEL competencies and technology-supported strategies educators and students can use to develop healthier, more productive learning environments. Presenter: Susan Brooks-Young.

Name That Badge!

Micro-credentials and educator professional
development

Woman pointing to a variety of badges
Click image above to watch recording of the webinar.

Educators earn credentials at the beginning of their careers, but they learn new skills every day. A micro-credential system provides teachers with the opportunity to gain recognition for skills they master throughout their careers. In this recorded webinar, Karen Cator, President and CEO of Digital Promise, provides you with an “executive summary” of the concept of badges and micro-credentials, what they accomplish, and how to implement them..

Karen Cator photoFrom 2009-2013, Karen was Director of the Office of Educational Technology at the U.S. Department of Education, where she led the development of the 2010 National Education Technology Plan and focused the Office’s efforts on teacher and leader support. Prior to joining the department, Cator directed Apple’s leadership and advocacy efforts in education. Read more about Karen.

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Systemic Improvement Using Netbooks – Part 1 of 2

Fort Smith Public Schools in Fort Smith, AR, implemented a 1:1 program with netbooks in several junior high and high school classrooms to create a more student-centered and project-based focus.  Spearheaded by the district’s Professional Development Center, emphasis was first placed on changing the pedagogical paradigm. In this first of two parts, professional development director, Dr. Kathleen Cates, discusses the intensive professional development program, teachers share how the netbooks (mini laptops) encourage student engagement, and you will see students learning at their own pace.

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